2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale
2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale__after
2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale__front

Description

Product Description

A complete revision of Psychology of the Unconscious (orig. 1911-12), Jung''s first important statement of his independent position.

Review

"The work is an intellectual tour de force of a very considerable calibre, as witnessed by the quite extraordinary amount of mythological material put into it, and the extensive research this must have required." ― The Journal of Analytical Psychology

From the Back Cover

Because of his consideration on many literary works, Classical, Oriental, and Western, Symbols of Transformation has a particular interest for students of literature.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
80 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Randolph Severson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Masterpiece of Soul-Making
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2021
A classic and epic study. It’s been more than a hundred years since Jung wrote this captivating book. And in a hundred years, there is still no equal, and, in a fundamental sense, almost nothing new in the modern history of psychology since the lives and works of the... See more
A classic and epic study. It’s been more than a hundred years since Jung wrote this captivating book. And in a hundred years, there is still no equal, and, in a fundamental sense, almost nothing new in the modern history of psychology since the lives and works of the original triumvirate Freud, Jung and Adler. As Henri Ellenberger demonstrated in his magisterial, The History of the Unconscious — a door stop in thickness of a book but the best doorway into Modern Psychology — Freud, Jung, Adler had precursors in Shamanism and in the philosophic schools of Classical Antiquity, but no real successors, with the exception, perhaps, of the Archetypal Psychology of James Hillman. And perhaps the reason is the decline to the cusp of disappearance of what Jung so impressively illustrates here: that the study and application through amplification and analogy of myths and literature is the via regia to interpreting the dynamics and meanings of psychic expressions and events. How does one to learn to interpret dreams, fantasies, narratives and stories, in other words how does one learn to be a psychologist? There may be no better way than the rigorous study of this book, an analysis of a single dream series. Nearly every page teems with dramatic imagery and decisive insight. From the perspective of 2021 Jung doesn’t seem so much to have broken with Freud as to complement him as Adler seemed to complement them both in their joint development of a hermeneutical, interpretative psychology faithful and illuminating of what Religion has always called ‘the Soul’. A masterpiece of what Hillman called ‘Soul-Making’.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Ed
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Classic Jung
Reviewed in the United States on December 11, 2009
Jung''s intention behind writing this book and otherwise investigating this field was to expand the symbolic expressions that arise from the unconscious beyond the scope of Freud''s pansexualism. For the most part Jung deferred to Freud''s interpretation of dreams, but... See more
Jung''s intention behind writing this book and otherwise investigating this field was to expand the symbolic expressions that arise from the unconscious beyond the scope of Freud''s pansexualism. For the most part Jung deferred to Freud''s interpretation of dreams, but radically opposed Freud''s exclusive reliance on sexuality as the sole cause of unconscious impulses. "Symbols of Transformation" is Jung''s attempt at explaining a variety of other-than-sexual causes for the symbols and impulses that arise from the unconscious. By discussing these unconscious forces, Jung relies upon his theory of the collective unconscious and the archetypes, which he deals with more explicitly in volume 9/1.

Jung begins with a short chapter on two modes of thinking which explain the means through which unconscious archetypes can intrude upon conscious. The first mode of thinking he mentions is directed thinking, which is defined by taking thoughts and ideas meaningful to the individual and translating them into objectively relay-able symbols, or in our case, words. This type of thought he claims is discursive and tends to be quite exhausting. The applications and merits of this type of thought are self-evident. The next form of thinking he addresses is dreaming or fantasy-thinking. In this type of thought, images come and go as they please. The verbal constraints found in directed thinking vanish and instead, images and feelings. This form of thinking is effortless, spontaneous and seemingly guided by unconscious motives (18). Jung writes that the advantages modern man has over his ancestors is that he has learned to focus his energies onto directed thinking, while the earlier humans who had the same intellectual capacities (although less material knowledge) emphasized this fantasy-thinking. It was this early preponderance on fantasy-thinking that caused early humans to invest so heavily in mythology. Their myths were the living manifestations of the societies focus on fantasy thinking. Whatever it was that pre-occupied the unconscious of the early society quickly manifested itself in the sphere of mythology. These unconscious motivations are what Jung will call archetypes. He finds that the same archetypes that can be inferred from mythology are the exact same archetypes found in the psyche of people today. Just as their motivations crafted myths, Jung believes they still influence us today.

Jung later picks up on the archetype of sexuality, which he believed Freud used so nebulously that it lost all meaning (135). Jung does to a degree recognize that sexual energy or more generally as he used the term, libido had overtly sexual sources. He writes that music most assuredly had sexual origins, but to place music in the same category as sex today would be absurd. Jung writes that the sexual energy was divorced from the physiologically act and applied to secondary sexual situations. In the case of music, one''s dance or drumming could secure them a mate. Jung also suggests that reinvested energy may be what causes animals to build nests and care for their young. As the original energy caused the production of ova and spermatozoa, animals that could direct their energy to safe-guarding the environment of their offspring led to advantages in child production. I am not sure how well these theories mesh up with evolutionary biology, but this is how Jung understood it.

This reallocation of sexual energy Jung also attributes to the origin of art. This freed energy simply sought a abstract expression beyond its original biological intention. In this sense, Jung is expanding Freud''s definition of libido beyond its strictly sexual origin to account for any bodily impulse that encourages the individual to act.

Such impulses Jung identified as the source of neurotic behavior. Spontaneous rhythmic behavior Jung (as well as Freud) attributed to rhythmic suckling of children that finds other applications upon sexual maturity. Jung mentions a case of a young girl beset by such an affliction coupled with sexual compulsions. Jung explained it as sexual energy redirecting itself though rhythmic behavior, which he finds to be a common means of dissipating energy (but in the case of the girl, the rhythm could not fully release her energy). He goes on to write that a dog scratching at a locked door or a man stroking his beard when thinking are both ways of expressing energy when the individual''s intended object cannot be achieved. When the expression of libido is completely blocked, Jung claims that all manner of aberrant behavior manifests unconsciously. If this energy is not properly released, neuroses arise.

The remainder of the book addresses various examples of archetypal images found in mythology and the unconscious impulses associated with them, such as the hero as a manifestation of the idealized unconscious, the voyage as roughly spiritual awakening and water as the unconscious. I feel that many of these examples are difficult to follow due to their seemingly esoteric nature. If one is well versed in obscure Greek mythology, perhaps they would read a bit more easily, but I found that his sometimes brainy, abstract meanderings ultimately detracted from his argument. Regardless, by thus juxtaposing the impulses and archetypes of the unconscious, Jung allows his reader to draw his/her own conclusions about how well mythology is a symbolic expression for the yearnings of the unconscious. By following the myths, we can see how earlier thinkers mapped out the unconscious mind, letting us know what to seek and what to avoid in getting to know the Self. As is a common critique of Jung, I wished he would have been more explicit with his correlations rather than leaving the actual connecting of the dots up to the reader.
48 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Andrew
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great buy
Reviewed in the United States on January 4, 2021
Honestly, I am too intimidated to begin the book but it did come in excellent condition :0
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Mysterium C.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of C. G. Jung''s hardest volumes! Very challenging even for a Jungian PhD student...
Reviewed in the United States on July 2, 2015
One of Jung''s hardest books to understand and I don''t think I still fully get it. It is dense with symbolic references. I am in a Jungian PhD program and this text was required but I had to reread it several times to get it.
9 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
D. Wolf
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Symbols of Transformation
Reviewed in the United States on September 19, 2005
This is not an easy read, but it is worth the time and effort. I have a link to Dictionary.com and purchased a Latin translation program to help me through. I have notes all over the margins and have to read and reread and reread paragraphs to follow Jung''s train of... See more
This is not an easy read, but it is worth the time and effort. I have a link to Dictionary.com and purchased a Latin translation program to help me through. I have notes all over the margins and have to read and reread and reread paragraphs to follow Jung''s train of thought. The book is a lot of work, but it is fascinating, and nothing this good ought to be easy. You will get back everything you put in, but it requires committment.
41 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Rah Kee Young
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2017
Excellent
Helpful
Report
Bellicornes
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One Star
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2017
A whole chapter was missing. Unacceptable.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Brian R. Wingrove
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you''re interested in learning the keys to understanding how ...
Reviewed in the United States on September 28, 2015
If you''re interested in learning the keys to understanding how the mind communicates to us through symbols, this is where to start.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

wendy felstead
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 6, 2017
Excellent book. Love Jung''s work
Report
Anthony Marinelli
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
SYMBOLS SYMBOLS SYMBOLS..to be something else
Reviewed in Canada on August 4, 2013
Who doesnt want to be something else..hopefully better but not comprehending what exactly that means? WE could be transformed by a person from our youth a missed opportunity..the variables are endless and instead of achieving a way toward some transformed state..we remain...See more
Who doesnt want to be something else..hopefully better but not comprehending what exactly that means? WE could be transformed by a person from our youth a missed opportunity..the variables are endless and instead of achieving a way toward some transformed state..we remain stunterd or regress or want to be somewhere else..a book largely of literary criticism, biblical and from various mythic literature including Indian, we congratulate the author at dipping into a large variety of sources, so many variables to developa view..but it remains dense for the general reader..of interest for those interested in myths and biblical literature and being transformed? Much of it is filled with dream images and to take an unfortunate image sexual assault. Erotic dreams of women.he finds "burglars, thieves, murderers, and sexual maniacs"..all ways in which the dreamer feels vulnerable to attack or a fear either somewhat rational or phobic..and the means usually today strangulation, knife, gun..or some item and theres a relation sometimes in a dream(as opposed to an actual attack)it has something to do with the women''s psychological state which is different from a real situation?..Many think of the modern person as constructed by science and technology as starting from the time of DEscartes but he goes back further to scholastic times..and really this process though many of the thinkers taught throughout southern europe really comes out of germany and the monastic communities which developed schools..as many of the best teachers emanated from.."modern directed thinking and the techniques fostered by it"(p 19)..A vein of romance, always finds itself cropping in his work..first love..as in the famous book by Turgenev "young girls..first love..have great difficulty in expressing themselves owing to disturbances brought about by regressive reactivation of the father..."..many have found such old mystical ideas as "medieval psychology"(p 44)..he notes his critics..and you can write a paper on this it can be a sign of remembrance and fulfillment and meaningful relations leading to..or it can be pathological like any relationship. On p 70 the "inability to be happy without friends." Ideas of mediation bringing on a state or do we value the mediator or a combo..like fries and a hamburger.. Going back to love..the psychoanalyst is here..he finds if you are unable to find a love object..refer back to first love..is it do to a lack of suitable objects or "inability."(p 173)..the person who feels the average persons in a middle class or lower class environment as opposed to the affluent, the politico, the famous, the media star..mentally intoxicated in some sense..being able to love..contemplation as it relates to self image and how we are perceived(he does not go into this)..FRom p 228 (see the recent george clooney film ides of march an old fashioned kind of film)..the "scientific mind"..the "cult of sex"..sex as some magic formula producing euphoria..equating it with happiness..if we go back to old communities like Corinth..its an old problem and he gives his views in the following pages...an old poem "and now she has broken that happy bond"(p 361).. He ends on the fantasies of Miller a tale he read where he had some critics the U.S>..as well as many other critics worldwide..she dreams of being on a "pedestal"..she goes on "fragments of philosophy,aesthetics and religion..produce this beautiful dream"(p 454)..see FRagments by Marilyn Monroe(poems, intimate notes, letters)..in her case it remains fragments as diagnosed at the time diagnosed with exactly what we dont know but needing psychotherepeutic help..far from being whole..complete like the Jungian mandala..a symbol of psychic health..actually though our consciousness is made up of an integrated cenception of some kind in most people..the coalescence of so many fragmented pieces and aspects the number is huge..and we break off all kinds of pieces from various places..here he notes a few..and hopefully it leads to a sense of wholeness..fulfillment..well being leading to a transformed(transformation)..self to some type of future mental well being..as long as it avoids regression..so are the views here described and as I note there are many practitioners these days and transpersonal psychology is a large field..and varies..and they may disagree with things i say..or views i have here..or just to be disagreeable the world of specialistrs?..let us go back to the mythic world..snakes and ladders..the sun that shines all day..black holes..parallel worlds..dimensional worlds..adam and eve..eyes opened real wide..or like the film eyes wide shut..love and Samson and DElilah..the scorned lover exacting revenge for imaginary slights and a world which never existed..the mad bomber fighting a war..for an unattainable position..these are all mythic worlds of gods and goddesses..and change...maturity as the fletcher tale.."to marry the woman he had scorned and so ends the play"..or is it just the beginning if love has the last word or she remains or he enclosed in their own world of their own making..For those interested in these subjects theres plenty to amuse themselves with here.
Report
Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in Canada on October 16, 2017
Pricy
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale

2021 discount Symbols sale of Transformation (Collected Works of C.G. wholesale Jung Vol.5) online sale